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 An alternative to sandblasting

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Dennis Wess

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PostSubject: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:04 pm

Ever hear of Sodablasters ?

My son clued me in about them when I was telling him I'd like to have a small sandblaster unit for my workshop.

Anyone have one of these things ?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CIkyg5R-YU
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Bob



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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:13 pm

Doesn't seem that soda would do much. But it does! Have not tried it myself but certainly do intend to try it. I've seen a guy clean up a carb and it actually looked like new.

Bruce Hagen
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Bill n



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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 3:01 pm

Would it be possible to just use soda in place of sand in a sand blaster?
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Ron in Radio Heaven

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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 3:16 pm

I saw photos of them soda blasting a vintage radar at the National Electronics museum.
The nice this about soda is it's not as rough on the metal as sand is and it'll just dissolve when you're done.

If I had room, I'd love to have a blasting cabinet.

73, Ron w4ron

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newhall



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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 3:18 pm

What a bunch of crap. Notice how they blasted absolutely NO rust? The main purpose of blasting is to remove rust. I could use just about anything to blast with and it would take paint off. I also noticed that they are going to have to replace some glass on that car. It looks like they didn't even mask it off. Ricocheted blasting material still has enough velocity to etch glass. Unless perhaps soda is so weak it will not etch glass? Which is why they do not show it blasting rust......
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dynadude

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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 3:31 pm

newhall wrote:
What a bunch of crap. Notice how they blasted absolutely NO rust? The main purpose of blasting is to remove rust. I could use just about anything to blast with and it would take paint off. I also noticed that they are going to have to replace some glass on that car. It looks like they didn't even mask it off. Ricocheted blasting material still has enough velocity to etch glass. Unless perhaps soda is so weak it will not etch glass? Which is why they do not show it blasting rust......

Lots of times it's more important to not remove any metal, so any media that would remove rust is out of the question.

Many pro painters use walnut shells in their blasters for that reason. The shells won't damage any metal, but they take off paint and grime just great.

I've always considered the sand media as a health hazard anyway. Inhaling any rock dust is very unhealthy.
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Jon the Grimm

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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 3:44 pm

Soda is incapable of removing rust. Its best for stuff like removing paint from fiberglass. One downside, at least for automotive use, is that the residue it leaves is invisible and somewhat difficult to remove, and can cause paint to lift later on.
Glass beads works well for removing grime and corrosion without removing metal.
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Tom Albrecht



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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 4:01 pm

Soda blasting is a well accepted industrial process. Very nice for cleanup, since the soda dissolves in water. This is even used in clean room settings.
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RCA Bob



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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 4:27 pm

I guess I'll have to add my 2-cents worth here about soda blasting.

It seems that one of the advantages to using soda as an abrasive media is that it doesn't create as much heat as sand, therefore greatly reducing the chance of warping large body panels. It's also much friendlier to the environment. However, when there are rusted areas of the body or chassis, sand is still the best product for the media when handled properly. Sand is definately harsher than soda, but they both have their proper place in the automotive restoration market.

I have a blasting cabinet as well as a pressure blaster (used outdoors) and sand is the most affordable media. I have found that I must use caution when using it on delicate surfaces, but it really works great when rust removal is a factor. I always wear a resporator mask to help avoid breathing dust from the sand as it has been proven to be as dangerous as cigarette smoking. (I'm glad I kicked that habit a few years back)

Soda, sand, crushed walnut shells, glass beads, are all very good abrasives when used in their proper application. Arrow Arrow
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Lou deGonzague



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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 4:28 pm

I have the Harbor Freight cabinet blaster and wonder how I did without it. I have been using small blasters for many years. About 30 years ago I had to clean a large brass door knocker that had coats of paint on it. After soaking in paint stripper and pressure washing it still had some residue in the pitted metal. I used baking soda in my cup blaster and it worked great. After rinsing in water and several days out in the sun I shot some lacquer on it. I thought I was the first guy to think of using soda Surprised Today I use mostly glass bead or the walnut shells for delicate work. The blast cabinet was on sale for $80 and I added my own light inside. I have a 5 hp 30 gal tank compressor but you could use a smaller unit if you don't mind waiting for it to catch up to build pressure. Cleaning those pesky loctal pins is a real pleasure with this rig.
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Mike Toon

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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Wed Oct 20, 2010 6:12 pm

"most jobs can easily be done in a day" It's slow and can take all day to do that Camaro door.
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Radiosmoker

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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Thu Oct 21, 2010 1:16 am

The Navy has experimented with blast media, and has come up with a few methods that work quite well, on ships hulls, a lot was done as paint had heavy metals-anti corrosive and anti-fouling.
Sand and water mix-no dust.
carbon dioxide pellets- evaporate and just leave paint residue.
Another one was Ice Pellets.
Soda works well under very High Pressure. I beleive the Sandblasters used 2 inch lines.
--------------------------------------
In Shop
I used two Shop blasters, one was oxide and the other was glass bead, The oxide was to remove corrosion and the glass bead was used on metal and plastics. We used to get a lot of static arcing if the metal pieces were not grounded. We used 120-140 PSI from Room size shipyard compressors. 3/4 or 1" lines, no lack of pressure was detected.

Both Had multiple collector filter bags for paint dust, and recycle hopper. We would have to use a shaker to remove the dust in a sealed collection bag.

The Blasters were used, by our painters, and electronics personnel to clean everything from pressure gage cases, to Electronic cases and hardware.

We could strip, and repair, repaint apply decals, Photo etch labels, engraved and tagged.

We were required to use safety glasses and earplugs in the blast room. Be safe Wink
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Jaycebot

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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Thu Oct 21, 2010 5:44 am

My dad is a master automotive painter for Ford, he highly recommends soda blasting. Sandblasting leaves tiny pits in the metal. After soda-blasting they go over it again with another compound to remove the rust.
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burnt fingers



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PostSubject: Re: An alternative to sandblasting   Thu Oct 21, 2010 6:25 am

If you use Prep Step to loosen the rust then soda blasting will do the rest.
http://www.zero-rust.com/zero-rust-prep-step.html

I use Black Beauty oxide for serious rust on frames and suspension components but rarely on sheet metal. For that its a beach sand silica where I wear a full air suit.

Walnut shells and glass beads are pretty much the standard for body panel paint removal and I do use soda on those Stromberg 97's and other vintage carbs. The glass is fine on cast aluminum such as intakes, flatheads, wheels, dress up brackets, etc.

Carl
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