Antique Radios Forum

This is the temporary home of the Antique Radio Forums while a new server to host it is being found. You will have to register here to post. Please Note: None of these topics will be preserved when the original forums are back.
 
HomeCalendarFAQSearchMemberlistUsergroupsRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Aaron

avatar

Posts : 40
Join date : 2010-10-12
Location : Mesa, Arizona

PostSubject: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 2:31 am

I hear people on this forum talking about doing a "48-hour burn-in" when they recap a set. Is this necessary or desirable? If so, why?

Aaron
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Johnnysan



Posts : 64
Join date : 2010-10-12

PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 3:16 am

If a repair/restoration was done properly, it probably isn't necessary.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
gvel

avatar

Posts : 14
Join date : 2010-10-12
Age : 61
Location : Howell, MI

PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 3:47 am

To me, a burn in is a period of time the radio is played before it's put back into the cabinet. It's not a matter of conditioning anything.

48 hours is overkill, and it's a generic term. Play it long enough, so you're confident it's "good to go"!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
marcc

avatar

Posts : 30
Join date : 2010-10-12
Location : Victoria, Australia

PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 5:38 am

I learnt very early from a quality assurance person from a Japanese company. I respect his comment as I have, over decades proven this comment to be fact.

They had worked out by careful observation and stastistics that the vast majority of component failures (new equipment), occured within three operating hours. So the equipment was run for a specific time (burn tested).

That's why their equipment was so reliable, any duds were weeded out by them, not the customer. You were assured that what came out of their factory, worked, So you bought with confidence.

Marc

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Steve Johnson

avatar

Posts : 46
Join date : 2010-10-12
Location : Upstate New York

PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 6:22 am

Just an FYI for those that don't know:

When I worked for a defense contractor "Burn-in" was actually done in a giant oven. Embarassed Hence the term "Burn-in". The components or circuit were run at high temperatures usually beyond what the specified max working temp was. Sometimes they were run repeatedly at higher and higher temps till they failed to establish what a safe max operating temp was. Sometimes ones that survived were used in production. cheers Just depended on what the testing specifications called for.

There was also "Shake and Bake" tests where they were also subjected to massive vibrations. bounce
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.stevenjohnson.com
philsoldradios

avatar

Posts : 16
Join date : 2010-10-18

PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 10:10 am

I think "burning in" usually refers to new equipment.

For restored sets, perhaps "reliability test" is a better term. I usually play a restored set for a few hours before declaring victory. Occasionally, there will be a marginal original part that works for a short time but gives up the ghost when exposed to normal operating voltage and heat for the first time in decades. This is more common with vintage TVs, which have more components than radios. I do the reliability test with the set in its cabinet, so you know that everything is happy under normal heat buildup.

The aim is not to condition the new parts, but to confirm that the remaining original parts are reasonably sound.

Speaking of burning in, the photo shows an aging rack at a 1947 Hytron tube factory. Each tube was powered in series with a light bulb for "final seasoning and degassification."

Phil Nelson


Back to top Go down
View user profile http://antiqueradio.org/index.html
bobwilson1977



Posts : 16
Join date : 2010-10-13

PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 10:20 am

I've never actually "burned-in" a set. So far I guess I've been lucky because I tend to use my sets a lot. To me the big test is whether the set blows up or works. You never know what's going to happen!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
radiotechnician



Posts : 35
Join date : 2010-10-12

PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 12:13 pm

There is a reason for a burn-in after a restoration. The radio may not have operated on a continuous basis for 60 years. No amount of static testing of insulation, especially old, can predict what will happen.

If you get paid to repair a very old radio, your reputaion goes with it. The other issue is the new parts may not have been manufactured as well as old ones were.

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Bob D.



Posts : 13
Join date : 2010-10-13

PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 1:45 pm

I'm retired from a big OEM car radio manufacturer. All our product went through a 24 hr burn in. I like to play a restoration project on the bench for a day or so, before putting the chassis back in the cabinet. Once in a while a part actually fails, usually a tube.

Bob D.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Aaron

avatar

Posts : 40
Join date : 2010-10-12
Location : Mesa, Arizona

PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 3:26 pm

philsoldradios wrote:
For restored sets, perhaps "reliability test" is a better term. I usually play a restored set for a few hours before declaring victory. Occasionally, there will be a marginal original part that works for a short time but gives up the ghost when exposed to normal operating voltage and heat for the first time in decades. This is more common with vintage TVs, which have more components than radios. I do the reliability test with the set in its cabinet, so you know that everything is happy under normal heat buildup.

That's what I did with a set that I just finished for a friend. I left it on all night (in the cabinet), and when I came back in the morning, everything was working normally, and the FM station I was tuned to hadn't even drifted. No parts failures, so I'd consider that a success. Smile

I sure hope he likes the work I did. The set was barely functional when I got it, even though the eBay seller said that it was "working excellent," or words to that effect.

Aaron
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Aaron

avatar

Posts : 40
Join date : 2010-10-12
Location : Mesa, Arizona

PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   Fri Oct 22, 2010 3:46 pm

philsoldradios wrote:
Speaking of burning in, the photo shows an aging rack at a 1947 Hytron tube factory. Each tube was powered in series with a light bulb for "final seasoning and degassification."

Wouldn't it be funny if one of us owned a set containing one of the tubes shown on the cover of that magazine? It would be an astonishing coincidence, and there's no way to tell, but that would be pretty cool, I think! Cool

Aaron
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?   

Back to top Go down
 
What's the purpose of a "burn-in"?
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Burn some neurons.
» Have You Broke Something on Purpose?
» Anyone starting to burn out on fallout 4
» The Purpose of a Forum (Opinion Piece)
» Dark Water Rising by Mariana Hale

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Antique Radios Forum :: Antique Radio Forums :: Electrical/Mechanical Restoration-
Jump to: